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Athabasca University

Course Description

Topic: Strategy for Technological Competitiveness

Delivery Mode: Independent Study Online

Credits: 3 (Elective)

Prerequisites: Program Director approval is required. Students must contact the MSc IS Office prior to registration in this course.

Centre: School of Computing and Information Systems

Academic Period: January – April 2017

Professor: Dr. Gilberto Olavarrieta

* Learning outcomes 

Educational aims

The course aims to form professionals who can:

 

Identify and perform the technological innovation assessment in processes, products, and services.

 

Craft, formulate and implement strategies for transferring ideas, innovative practices, and prototypes into products with a high content of “competitive innovation” involved, as well as a social value.

 

Align the technological innovation strategy to the business strategies, as well as to the global business opportunities.

 

Create new forms to compete based on the adequate use of technological innovation.

 

Create new spaces for technology and/or innovation based spin outs.

Objectives:

The basic objective of this course is to prepare the individual as a strategist capable to take advantage of global business opportunities using and applying leading edge technological innovations.  Through this course the student will:

 

Identify and perform the technological innovation.(in processes, products, etc) assessment.

 

Craft, formulate and implement strategies for transferring ideas, initiatives, innovative practices, etc…into products and services with a high content of “competitive innovation” involved, as well as a social value.

 

Align the technological innovation strategy to the business strategies, as well as to the global business opportunities.

 

Create new models to compete based on the adequate use of technological innovation.

 

Create new spaces for technology and/or innovation based spin outs.

 

* Course materials  

Basic bibliography

Creativity and Strategic Innovation Management.
Author: Malcolm Goodman, Sandra M. Dingli., Editorial: Routledge, 1 edition, 2012.

ISBN-10: 0415663555
ISBN-13: 978-0415663557

Good readings on the technological innovation topic:

Blueprint for the Digital Economy. D. Tapscott. McGraw. 1998

·         C. Shapiro, Varian. Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy. Harvard Business School Press. 1999

·         Competitors. L. Fahley. John Wiley. 1999

·         “Competing through Innovation and Learning” Industrial Development Report 2002/2003. UNIDO. Document available at: www.unido.org

·         Cracking the Value Code. R. Bulton. Arthur Andersen Eds. Harper. USA. 2000.

·         Darwin and the Demon: Innovating within established enterprises. [Geoffrey A. Moore] HBR.

·         Economics of Strategy. D. Besanko. John Wiley. 1996

·         Harvard Business Review on: Managing High-Tech Industries. Harvard Business School Press. 1999

·         Hypercompetitive Rivalries. D´Aveni. Free Press. 1994.

·         Information Rules. J. Lewis. Free Press. 1995

·         Now or Never. Mary Modahl. Harper Business. 2000.

·         On Competition. M. Porter. HBS Press USA. 1998

·         Rethinking competitive advantage and how ICTs generate new forms to collaborate and standardizing. [MIT Sloan Management Review].

·         Seeing what is Next. C. Christensen, et al. HBS Press. 2004

·         Strategic Process. H. Mintzberg. Prentice Hall. 1997

·         Technology in Context. E. Braun. Routledge.1998

·         The connected Corporation. J. Lewis. Free Press. 1995

·         The Internet Depression. M. J. Mandel. Basic Books. 2000

·         The New Competitive Advantage. M. Best. Oxford University Press. USA. 2001

·         The Death of Competition J. M. Moore. Harper Business, 1996

·         The new rules for bringing innovation to market [Bhaskar Chakravorti]. HBR.

 

* Course structure  

Course Structure

Topics

1. Challenge of changing times

·         Business Environment

·         Key business decisions

·         Administration revisited

2. Preparing responses

·         Thinking

·         Learning

·         Individual and Group Creativity

·         Paradigms

3. Innovation

·         Key principles of innovation

·         Systems and Network Support

·         Innovation applied to organizations

·         Organizational Culture

4. Managing the change

·         Importance of leadership

·         Preplanning

·         Strategy for change

·         Forecasting Methodologies

 

* Assessment structure 

To obtain the final grade, which consists of lecture exercise, a project and a final exam, review the percentage detailed below.

Evaluation element

Balance

Lecture Excercises   ( 3 reports each 13.333)

40 %

Final project

1st delivery

10 %

2nd delivery

10 %

3rd delivery with presentation

20 %

Final exam

20 %

Evaluation aspects for each activity:

Project

Each of the 3 phases of the project has some fixed and variable elements. This section discusses the fixed elements; the variable elements are discussed in the definition for each phase.

  • Presentation: Students must show quality in the presentation of their projects, in addition, they must take care of the construction of the contents and presentation formats.
  • Content: The information provided must describe the most important elements related to the phase at hand.
  • Analysis: On each stage, an analysis of the project must be updated to reflect the findings of the stage.  At the end of the project, the students must discuss the advantages and disadvantages strategy document.
  • Research: Synthesize the information from different sources maintaining a clear focus consistent with the idea under development.
  • Conclusions: Must show the capability to analyze and interpret different type of information available throughout the project.
  • References: All sources of information must be cited using the APA format.

Lecture Exercise

Reports are a type of field research work where the following criteria will apply:

  • Introduction: show issues importance and relevance of the readings.
  • Content: presents in a clearly way results of research findings
  • Conclusions: illustrate close arguments to research
  • References: all material used and cited for research. Must include textbook chapters, papers related and –at least- five papers selected by each student.

Updated December 12 2016 by FST Technical Staff

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